Limit(less) Project: Sarah

Limit(less) is a documentary photography project by Mikael Owunna exploring the visual aesthetics of LGBTQ African immigrants. 

For more on the project, follow us on TumblrInstagramFacebook and Flickr.

Also please Donate to Support the Project.

Sarah: Lesbian Ugandan (Sweden)

Q. What’s your name, country of origin, ethnicity, pronouns, and how do you identify in terms of your LGBTQ identity?

Sarah Nakiito. Uganda. African. She/Her. Lesbian.


Q. How would you describe your style?

My clothing style? Oh god, it’s very mixed. I dress depending on the weather and mood. I’m not so strict with dress code in that way, if i want to wear a gown on a tuesday because i feel like it I will, so I wear depending on the weather and my mood. I wear a lot of African prints and my own design as well casual street wear (www.kalunjidesign.com).


Q. How do you think your style incorporates/blends elements of your African and LGBTQ identity?

I think it does most of the time but that’s not my goal. So I very much can and sometimes do pass as a straight person but my style isn’t connected to my lgbtq identity- not always purposefully .For the African part, very much so. Maybe not on a daily basis but generally, yeah, generally I wear a lot of African prints I design mostly from african prints. 


Q. Was there ever a time where you felt pushed away from your African or LGBTQ identities? If so, how did you overcome that personally?

I haven’t overcome it because that repeats every day. I live in a country of mostly white people- a white people’s country. So it’s not something I can slowly overcome or overlook.

I think I’m faced more with those challenges when I get to Uganda because of the anti-LGBTQ culture and harsh laws against homosexuality, I’m not open - let me see - I don’t display that much of my sexual identity when I’m there because I know that you can just- it can end up with me getting killed. So I’m very aware of how I am and how I present myself as well as who I share specific information with. It’s not the same way here in Sweden. I’m though more challenged being a black woman and a black immigrant here. And if I would face any challenges with regard to my lgbtq identity it would be with black people here because there aren’t so many open black queer people in Sweden. So me being a black woman is more challenging in terms of discrimination in different ways.

I’m very much so an African person. That is my first identity before me being a gay person or something else- being a woman is my first and than being an African woman. So I don’t try to blend in [here in Sweden] because that’s impossible to do.


Q. How is your relationship with your family, and what does being “accepted” by your family look like for you?

My relationship with my family is okay, I’m closer to some and not so close to others. I’ve come to accept the gay part of myself and not so keen on seeking affirmation from others relatives or not. I’m not interested, I don’t need to be approved in that sense. I’ve never really “come out” in this official way that many people do. I’ve just introduced my partners when I’ve gotten with someone, in the same way that I’ve introduced the men in my life before. “This is my partner, this is my partner.” And i don’t really stick around for people’s opinions and reactions. And I’ve made this very clear to many people, and if they have opinions those opinions are not relevant to me.

I don’t talk about my sexual identity with my family except for my siblings and cousins- younger family yes and older ones no. Like aunts. It’s not a secret, but it’s not relevant. If they asked me “do you have a partner” I would tell them, but the times I’ve met them I’ve not had one. And for me it has to come out in some natural way, I’m not going to say it to be spiteful or for the shock value. They are not part of my daily life so they are not part of my life in that sense.

“Acceptance”? For me to accept my choices. For me coming from an African family, acceptance means way more than who you are sleeping with, how you wear your hair, what university program you’re in, are you in university, and for those who don’t accept they aren’t that close to me. I came to Sweden as a refugee with my 5 siblings, and those are the people that I’m closest to. And if I need to talk to someone I go to them. Not to aunties, jajas. So I can stand any judgement from them for the week or whatever that I’m with them. But if it’s too much I can tell them that I don’t accept that- them talking badly about gay people and especially gay men- and that I don’t want my daughter to hear that, and they shut up after that. I’m not raising my daughter to hate people who have nothing to do with her. And that extends to whatever country I’m raising her in. And nobody talks like that in my house or anywhere near my house. I can’t do damage control constantly. So that’s what I do without outing myself, because they are just against gay people.

Acceptance is to accept who I am, I’m not a 3 year old, I’m way past the age for them to shame me. And they’ve learned and they’ve seen me, so they don’t. They have their own issues now. For example if I say “you can’t talk about gay people like that” they say “of course, you would say that” and the bigger surprise to them is if I said nothing because they know that I’m politically active and it’s a way for them to provoke me. 


Q. What would you have to say to people who say that being LGBTQ is “un-African”?

I would say that sounds stupid and ignorant- that’s so ignorant to them. Sexual orientation and gender are not connected to ethnicity. It has nothing to do with ethnicity, that’s what I would say. 


Q. How was participating in the Limit(less) shoot?

Uhhh! Hard! Hard with a capital “H” because as much as I’m comfortable with myself and comfortable with who i am the self esteem part of myself but body image is something else. And I don’t usually expose myself like that. I let you be a part of who I am and let you into who I am. Not just physically but emotionally. And of course that would have some effect on me. And more than I thought it would. And that’s not something I’m used to, being the focus of someone. But it was also fun to be the focus for once. When you have a child, they are always the focus in the camera. And it was fun to be the center, for an hour, because you don’t get that much as a parent. It was nice to have an hour of me time. That’s what I would say about the shoot.


Q. What are you most excited about for Limit(less)?

To be in a context with other black queer people! Not so much my picture but to be in a context and to be in a majority somewhere. And for us to be in focus! And for us to have the light shine on us. Because we are fucking beautiful- I’ve seen the pictures. I love them and applaud the initiative. 


Q. Where are you comfortable with people reaching you on social media?

Can message me on facebook- https://www.facebook.com/nakiito

IG: @kalunji040

Mail: kalunjidesign@gmail.com



Limit(less) Project: Toshiro

Limit(less) is a documentary photography project by Mikael Owunna exploring the visual aesthetics of LGBTQ African immigrants. 

For more on the project, follow us on TumblrInstagramFacebook and Flickr.

Also please Donate to Support the Project.

Toshiro: Queer/Bisexual Ivorian (Canada)

Q. What’s your name, country of origin, ethnicity, preferred gender pronoun, and how do you identify in terms of your LGBTQ identity?

My name is Toshiro, I’m from Ivory Coast- Senoufo-Tagbana , I was born in austria and grew up in between europe and africa until my 17th, I answer to him and I identify as queer/bi

Q. Quel est votre nom, pays d’origine, éthnicité, votre pronom pour votre identité de genre, et comment vous identifiez-vous dans votre identité LGBTQ ?

Je m’appel Tosh, je suis originaire de la Côte-d’Ivoire -Senoufo-Tagbana, né en autriche et ayant grandit entre l’afrique et l’europe jusqu’à l’âge de 17ans je m’identifie en tant que Queer/bi  et réponds au pronom ‘il”.


Q. How would you describe your style?

I don’t like the idea of describing my style, because I believe my style is in constant evolution , depending on where I am in my life( professionally or artistically/ emotionally), who I am surrounded by …For instance, I have been pushing my dancing career to a professional turn for the past year and that have definitely influenced the way I choose to dress on a daily basis, knowing that I might have 3 to 4 differents rehearsal or shows/ casting in the same day where I need to be comfortable in my clothes and at the same time show who I am to create an interest in me a liltte extra, that can make the difference when all the other dancer in the room are looking for that same gig.

But there is few things that are constant in my style and that will be “the fluidity”, meaning the mix and match of what we call “men” clothes and “women” clothes, I do believe that any items of clothing can become an uni-sex garment and the need to look like no one else except myself.

Q. Comment décririez-vous votre style ?

Je n’aime pas l’idée de devoir décrire mon style, car je pense qu’il est en constant changement et évolution. Dépendement de comment ma vie évolue et ou je me situe émotionnellement, professionnellement ou artistiquement, et par qui je suis entouré… Justement, le fait que depuis 1 an et quelques mois j’ai décidé de pousser d’avantage au niveau de ma passion qui est la danse et d’en faire une carrière professionnel. Ce choix influence bien entendu la facon que je m’exprime vestimentairement depuis un peu plus d’1 an, s’achant que je peux avoir 3 à 4 répetitions différentes, des shows ou des auditions dans la meme journée et que je dois etre bien sure confortable dans ce que je portes et en même temps montrer un petit plus de ma personnalité, pour attirer un intérêt dans une salle rempli d’autres tres bons danseurs qui veulent tous le même contract que moi.

Mais certaines variantes sont récurrente dans mon style et il s’agit de mon désire de garder une liberté et une fluidité dans le passages et le mélange d’habits dit “masculin” ou “feminin”, je pense qu’il y a moyen de rentre n’importe quel item vestimentaire uni-sexe et enfin le désire d’apporter quelque chose de nouveau et de ressembler à personne sauf a moi même.


Q. How do you think your style incorporates/blends elements of your African and LGBTQ identity?

My styling doesn’t have to incorporate or blends element of my african or LGBTQ identity, me being black/african/ queer is enough (I believe) I mean I’m carrying my african identity and lgbtq identity by being me and by my acts, I’m trying when I can and everywhere I can to raise some awareness about the fight of both communities and that is how I incorporates my two identities without necessarily having to wear them.

But talking about style, my acts, as I said are doing the incorporation more than my style, by shopping less in big brands and white-owned businesses, by recycling and using clothes from thrift stores or clothes I got in modeling shoots or dance gigs, shows (usually locale designers from the LGBTQ community -often), in order to save money and having the ability to support and buy exclusively in black own businesses and designers creations and clothing… I want to, not only blend my african identity into my style, but actually wear my african identity.

Q. Comment pensez-vous que votre style incorpore ou mélange les éléments de votre identité africaine et LGBTQ ?

Je ne pense pas que mon style doivent forcement mélanger ou incorporer mon identité africaine ou LGBTQ , en étant tout simplement moi: noir/africain et queer, je porte déjà cette identité sans pour autant la refléter ou penser à la refléter dans mon style vestimentaire par mes actes, mes choix et mes convictions.

Mais si on pense au style, comme j’ai pu mentionner mes acts incorporent plus mes deux identité que mes vêtements. En effet, j’essaye d’eviter les achats le plus possible dans les grande chaînes de marques ou les magasins dirigé par des blancs, je recycle enormements que ce soit des habits de friperies ou des habits que je n’ai pas eu à acheter mais qui me sont donné dans le cadre de shoot de mode ou de contract/ show de danse (généralement de designer locaux issues de la communauté lgbtq). J’économise énormément pour pouvoir ensuite me permettre de faire mes achats dans des boutiques gérées par des noirs ou des creations de designers africains. Tout cela, pour à la fin ne pas avoir à incorporer ou mélanger mon identité africaine ou lgbtq mais littéralement les porter toutes les deux.


Q. Was there ever a time where you felt pushed away from your African or LGBTQ identities? If so, how did you overcome that personally?

I think I never felt pushed away from my African identity, but more by the religious predominant aspect of my african identity. I mean when people would be harsh or completely against my LGBTQ identity it would come from quoting , the “white men religion” ( christianity or islam) and I always felt like my africanity was beyond, that I’m black, I’m african, my ancestor, my roots are not coming from this hate culture of the diversity and homophobia that the colonizer brought to us. I might be lying to myself but I feel like I embraced my african identity since a couple of years now, by educating myself and understanding, where we come from, what we have been through and how brainwashed our continent is and that the hate we might encounter is not coming from within our roots but from years of colonizations and self-hate education provide by other people.

Concerning the LGBTQ community I would say when you are young discovering and learning about the LGBTQ community, you just feel at home and so welcomed, you think everyone loves you and you love everyone. But more the years goes and more I’m realising that: by being black and african I don’t really have much to say or do in that predominant white gay male community. So yes, often I feel pushed away, like I don’t have my place there or when I do it’s to be objectified. I do push that identity away because I feel like the agenda is so different and not reflecting what I need in that time and place as a black queer man. For example, Knowing that none of the huge canadian LGBTQ medias (white owned medias) didn’t talked about the arrest of DeRay McKesson, I really felt a gap. But as I do with my african identity. I do like to think about the roots of the communities and remember that the black folk created Pride back in the 70’s; I believe we had more voice in the LGBTQ community back then and when I think of these times I feel like there is room for me in the LGBTQ community and that it will take work from me and each of us to decrease this gap, and take back our voice and put it on the front line . 

Q. Vous est-il arrivé de repousser votre identité africaine ou LGBTQ ? Si oui, comment avez-vous surmonté cela ?

Je ne pense jamais avoir ressenti le besoin de repousser mon identité africaine, mais plus le sentiment de rejet de la charge religieuse liée à mon identité africaine. Le plus souvent quand les gens ont un problème avec ton identité queer ils se fient ou se basent sur leur religion pour juger, ses religions étant celle du colon j’ai toujours pensé que cette haine, intolérance n’était pas issue de la racine de mon continent mais du “lavage de cerveau religieux et social”. Je reste donc convaincu que mon intégrité par rapport a mon africanité réside dans ma recherche d’information et “self-education” pour comprendre d’où viens ce malaise que certain queer peuvent avoir face à leur africanité.

Concernant mon identitée LGBTQ, quand j’ai déménagé au canada que j’ai appris à connaitre la communauté LGBTQ à dominance blanche j’ai d’abord eu la poudre au yeux, j’ai trouvé ca génial, inclusif, ouvert, mais avec les années je me rends compts que les personnes racisée sont très peu inclusent voir misent sur le coté ou perçus comme de facon “objectivé” ou “fetishizé” , ce qui souvent me pousent a vouloir méloigner de cet identité qui ici ne semble pas m’inclure. Le simple exemple de voir un activiste noir ce faire arreter (DeRay Mckesson) et voir les medias généraux LGTBQ d’ici ne pas en parler ou de le rellayer au second plan de l’information me fatigue. Mais comme pour mon identité africaine, je me dit que les racines et la vraie nature de la communauté LGBTQ est plus inclusif et donnez plus de place aux personnes racisées, je n’ai qu’à penser au fait que la pride a etait créer par des queer racisées et je me dit qu’il vau se battre pour remettre notre voix au premier plan et qu’il faudra pour moi m’informer et m’éduquer pour comprendre cet exclusion des minorités racisées pour essayer de l’enrayer.


Q. How is your relationship with your family, and what does being “accepted” by your family look like for you?

Seriously my family is simply awesome, as soon as I am happy they are too, but when I say family I’m only considering my 2 sisters and my mom- my dad pass-away in 2009. But I might say that for my mom knowing that I’m bi made it easier for her to take it, and hope I end up with a girl at the end (hahah) but she never really pressured me about anything. Since I’m happy, healthy and doing something with my life everything is cool. But ya what matters for me is being cool with my close family my 3 wives ;p, for the rest i don’t really mind their opinion- I will do me.

Q. Quelle est votre relation avec votre famille, et que veut dire pour vous “être accépté” dans votre famille ? 

N/a


Q. What would you have to say to people who say that being LGBTQ is “un-African”?

I would asked them to read my answer about me feeling pushed away from my african identity . ;D

Q. Que diriez-vous aux personnes qui disent qu’être LGTBQ est “non-africain” ?

Je leur dirais de lire ma reponse à la question :”  Vous est-il arrivé de repousser votre identité africaine ou LGBTQ”. ;P


Q. How was participating in the Limit(less) shoot?

The shoot was mad fun, an amazing afternoon surrounded by beautiful queers color kids (more than 20) celebrating black pride in toronto surrounded by my “girls” , with a great sun and amazing temperature. You know the canadian weather is always boring, so we do enjoy a sunny day like no others. Was extremely funny to stand there on the table for more than 20 mins because the amazing photographer is having a blast shooting me  ahahahah (i love you mikki ;p)

Q. Comment etait-ce de participer au photoshoot Limit(less) ?

J’ai adoré le shoot, on la fait à toronto lors d’un chilling avec uniquement de jeunes beaux et belles queers de couleur, en célébrant la fierté noire, sous un beau soleil et une température de reve, oui avec la météo bizarre du canada , on sait apprécier une belle température comme personne d’autre. Enfin, j’ai beaucoup ri durant ce shoot à être là debout sur une table , par ce que le photographe a beaucoup trop de plaisir à me prendre en photo alors que je crame sous le soleil , ahhahaah


Q. What are you most excited about for Limit(less)?

I love the idea. I’m just hoping for limit(less) to keep on inspiring young africans all over the world about tolerance, and self love / acceptance. To keep on growing to create an amazing supporting and loving community of lgbtq from the diaspora and in the mother continent and to limit(less) to be recognized as a game changer in the voice of young africans from the LGBTQ community worldwide and why not an award.   

Q. Qu’est-ce qui vous plaît le plus dans Limit(less) ?

J’adore le concepte. Ce qui me plait c’est le fait que limit(less) peut inspirer la jeunesse noire dans le monde entier sur la tolérance et l’acceptation de soit. J’espère que le projet continuera à grandir en créant une communauté forte, aimante, pour les jeunes de la diaspora et ceux en Afrique. J’espère aussi que limit(less) pourra être reconnu comme une plateforme innovatrice pour permettre au jeunes LGBTQ de couleur de s’exprimer mondialement et pourquoi pas un prix un jour. 


Q. Where are you comfortable with people reaching you on social media?

Holla at a brother, let be a huge and POWERFUL community fighting for our rigths

IG: stylistiking

Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/user53533211



Limit(less) Project: Juliet

Limit(less) is a documentary photography project by Mikael Owunna exploring the visual aesthetics of LGBTQ African immigrants. 

For more on the project, follow us on TumblrInstagramFacebook and Flickr.

Also please Donate to Support the Project.

Juliet: Queer Ugandan-Rwandan (Sweden)

Q. What’s your name, country of origin, ethnicity, pronouns, and how do you identify in terms of your LGBTQ identity?

My name is Juliet Atto, also called Jules, and I was born in Uganda and raised in Sweden. I mainly have roots in Uganda but also Rwanda as my grandmother was Rwandan. My ethnicity is Acholi, a minority ethnic group in northern Uganda. My pronoun is she/her and I identify as queer.


Q. How would you describe your style?

Hard to say, but I would say “edgy” with a feminine twist, or perhaps feminine with an edgy twist? A mix of street and chic with vintage elements. My style evolves over time and I like to update myself and my wardrobe every 2-3 years or so, reflecting where I am in life at that moment.

The best word to use to describe my style today is ‘carefree’. I’m very comfortable with my body and I like to show it and have fun with my style. You can definitely tell that I’m a big city girl in the clothes I wear. My outfits tend to be very modern and expressive of who I am as a person: a young carefree black queer girl!


Q. How do you think your style incorporates/blends elements of your African and LGBTQ identity?

I would say my style is quite queer in the sense that it doesn’t fit into just one box. I love tight dresses and crop tops but also sneakers, button-up shirts and leather jackets. My style is not particularly African in the traditional sense, with African prints etc., but I have elements of what I’ve seen women in my ethnic group, Acholi, wear like bright colors and long skirts. I would, however, like to incorporate more traditional African prints in my wardrobe.


Q. Was there ever a time where you felt pushed away from your African or LGBTQ identities? If so, how did you overcome that personally?

Oh, yes. I’ve felt pushed away from my African identity because I was raised in Sweden and with barely any Ugandan traditions. I used to speak my native language, Acholi, when I was little but forgot it as my family and I were learning Swedish. Language is very important when it comes to culture and identity, so it’s a regret of mine that I’m not able to speak it anymore.

I haven’t until about a year and a half ago fully embraced my LGBTQ identity. I’ve been in LGBTQ surroundings for years and saw myself as an LGBTQ person but was never quite treated or seen as one by others. I’ve always been around white LGBTQ people and they didn’t really see me as queer. Also, being a femme woman and not being a lesbian hasn’t helped either. I’m seen as “unreliable” because I’m attracted to men as well, even though I’ve been out since I was 12 and discovered my attraction to girls long before boys and other gender identities.

I’ve overcome all of this by finding other black queer people and forming Black Queers Sweden, the feminist and anti-racist movement and independent organization for black LGBTQ+ people, where we can be ourselves; both black and queer. Finally I am around people who understand and I feel proud to be queer, black and African, all at once without compromise. I have also met other bisexual, pansexual and queer people and met gay people who are accepting, which has helped enormously.

As far as my African and Ugandan/Rwandan identity goes, I would like to get more in touch with it and my roots and I feel a stronger need for it the older I get.


Q. How is your relationship with your family, and what does being “accepted” by your family look like for you?

My relationship with my family in terms of my sexuality is great. I only felt the need to come out to my mom and for the rest I’ve made it an obvious thing, as obvious as being straight is. I haven’t made a big deal about it and neither have they. I understand how extremely privileged I am to be out to my family and I cherish it deeply. Although she may not always understand my sexuality, the fact that I’m attracted to all gender identities and not just one, my mom always taught me to be my own person and live a life that makes me happy. She taught me to be independent and strong and her acceptance was the only one I felt I needed so I’m truly blessed to have it.


Q. What would you have to say to people who say that being LGBTQ is “un-African”?

That is such an ignorant thing to say and believe. LGBTQ-phobia is actually Western, not African. Being LGBTQ is not limited to one race and is definitely not a “disease” from white people; LGBTQ-phobia is. The idea that only white people can be LGBTQ is. The more black queer people that get represented the more it becomes normal that hey, we’re loud! We’re here! We’re black and we’re queer!


Q. How was participating in the Limit(less) shoot?

It was amazing! Seeing Mikael in action was a great experience. He’s super talented and creative. I was a bit low on energy due to it being a stressful week when we had our shoot, but it was a lot of fun and I felt sexy and powerful! It’s an honor to be a part of this amazing, super important, ground- and norm breaking project!


Q. What are you most excited about for Limit(less)?

The exposure, visibility and normalization of black African LGBTQ people. It’s a long time coming but we’re finally organizing world wide and showing our flawless black and queer selves and mainstream society and the rest of the LGBTQ community are starting to take notice. A global revolution has started! 


Q. Where are you comfortable with people reaching you on social media?

Everywhere! Haha. I use Instagram and Twitter, @JulesAtto. I am also co-founder of Black Queers Sweden and we’re also on Instagram and Twitter: @BlackQueersSwe. We also use the hashtags #BlackQueersSwe and #BlackQueerMagic.

My IG: https://www.instagram.com/julesatto/

My TW: https://twitter.com/julesatto

Black Queers Sweden TW: https://twitter.com/BlackQueersSwe

Black Queers Sweden IG:  https://www.instagram.com/blackqueersswe/


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